Disability Support Perth

Mosaic support a number of disabilites. Many clients are supported for more than one disability.

We can help you create an NDIS plan that supports you in living an independent life. Here are some of the disabilities we are currently supporting.

Acquired brain injury (ABI) refers to any type of brain damage that occurs after birth. It can include damage sustained by infection, disease, lack of oxygen or a blow to the head.

Two thirds of all people with an ABI who have their activity limited or restricted are over the age of 45. One third of those are over the age of 65. The largest age group is between 40 and 49 and, at all ages except for those aged 80 and over, rates for males are higher than for females.

Brain injury can occur through:

  • sudden onset – caused by trauma, infection, lack of oxygen (for example, during near drowning or suicide attempts), strokes or drug use episodes
  • insidious onset – from prolonged alcohol or substance abuse, tumours or degenerative neurological diseases.

Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition that includes impairments in social interaction and developmental language and communication skills combined with rigid, repetitive behaviors. Because of the range of symptoms, this condition is now called autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It covers a large spectrum of symptoms, skills, and levels of impairment.

All people on the autism spectrum are affected to some degree in two main areas: social communication and repetitive patterns of behaviour. Autism is also often characterised by sensory sensitivities. Autism is a lifelong developmental condition.

According to Autism Spectrum Australia, 1 in 70 Australians are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The word spectrum reflects the wide range of difference that people on the spectrum experience and the extent to which they may be affected. No two people on the autism spectrum are alike, and all have unique strengths and interests.

Cerebral palsy is a description of a range of different disorders, all of which result in motor disability. They are multiple syndromes which are grouped together because they share similar clinical and supportive, allied health services.

Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture, resulting in difficulty with walking, or dependence on walking aids or a wheelchair for mobility. There is instability, lack of motor skills and muscle coordination. Stiff muscles and spasms can lead to painful skeletal deformities and dislocations.

Other symptoms may include total or partial inability to speak, see, hear and/or eat, impaired cognitive ability, and epilepsy.

Around 34,000 Australians have this physical disability.

Down syndrome is a genetic condition that occurs at conception, and is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In Australia about 1 in 700 children are born with down syndrome.

Deafness is defined as partial or complete hearing loss. Deaf and hard of hearing people can experience anything from a very mild to a total loss of hearing.

Elderly adults who frequently experience a loss of hearing, and as a result can potentially experience social isolation, relationship breakdowns and an increase in mental health related issues.

Environmental factors (such as noise, drugs, and toxins) and inherited disorders can lead to deafness.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 1993 there were 93,600 people in WA with some form of hearing loss and 1,200 of those people use Auslan (Australian sign language) as their main mode of communication.

95 per cent of deaf babies are born to non-deaf families.

Projections for 2050 indicate that one in every four Australians will have some form of hearing loss.

Intellectual disabilities or impairments develop before adulthood and can impact a person’s ability to learn, communicate, retain information, or undertake work or leisure activities.

An intellectual disability may be caused by genetic conditions, problems during pregnancy and birth, illness, or environmental factors.

Categories of mild, moderate, severe and profound levels of intellectual impairment are defined on the basis of IQ scores. A person is classified as having an intellectual disability if their IQ falls below 70.

Intellectual disabilities include autism, Fragile X Syndrome, Down Syndrome and Developmental Delay.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition of the central nervous system, interfering with nerve impulses within the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. It is characterised by sclerosis a Greek word meaning scars. These scars occur within the central nervous system and depending on where they develop, manifest into various symptoms.

MS affects over 25,600 in Australia and more than two million diagnosed worldwide. Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 20-40, but it can affect younger and older people too. Roughly three times as many women have MS as men.

There is currently no known cure for MS however there are a number of treatment options available to help manage symptoms and slow progression of the disease.

Source: www.ms.org.au 

A person is considered legally blind if they cannot see at six metres what someone with normal vision can see at 60 metres or if their field of vision is less than 20 degrees in diameter.

Government departments use the term ‘legally blind’ to define a person whose degree of sight loss entitles them to special benefits.

What is low vision?

A person is said to have low vision when they have permanent vision loss that cannot be corrected with glasses and affects their daily functioning.

Low vision can affect people of all ages and can have an impact on many aspects of a person’s life. It may cause problems with recognising faces, reading the newspaper, dialling the telephone or seeing road signs.

Blindness and low vision in Australia

In 2016 Vision Australia estimates there are 384,000 people in Australia who are blind or have low vision. We project this number will grow to 564,000 by 2030. (Refractive error* not included)

In Australia only 3% to 5% of print material is available in an accessible format. (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions website.)

*Refractive error is a condition of the eye that can generally be treated through the use of prescription glasses.

Information source: Visability Australia

Read more about living independently on the Vision Australia website

Mosaic support a number of disabilites. Many clients are supported for more than one disability.

We can help you create an NDIS plan that supports you in living an independent life. Here are some of the disabilities we are currently supporting.

Acquired brain injury (ABI) refers to any type of brain damage that occurs after birth. It can include damage sustained by infection, disease, lack of oxygen or a blow to the head.

Two thirds of all people with an ABI who have their activity limited or restricted are over the age of 45. One third of those are over the age of 65. The largest age group is between 40 and 49 and, at all ages except for those aged 80 and over, rates for males are higher than for females.

Brain injury can occur through:

  • sudden onset – caused by trauma, infection, lack of oxygen (for example, during near drowning or suicide attempts), strokes or drug use episodes
  • insidious onset – from prolonged alcohol or substance abuse, tumours or degenerative neurological diseases.

Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition that includes impairments in social interaction and developmental language and communication skills combined with rigid, repetitive behaviors. Because of the range of symptoms, this condition is now called autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It covers a large spectrum of symptoms, skills, and levels of impairment.

All people on the autism spectrum are affected to some degree in two main areas: social communication and repetitive patterns of behaviour. Autism is also often characterised by sensory sensitivities. Autism is a lifelong developmental condition.

According to Autism Spectrum Australia, 1 in 70 Australians are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The word spectrum reflects the wide range of difference that people on the spectrum experience and the extent to which they may be affected. No two people on the autism spectrum are alike, and all have unique strengths and interests.

Cerebral palsy is a description of a range of different disorders, all of which result in motor disability. They are multiple syndromes which are grouped together because they share similar clinical and supportive, allied health services.

Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture, resulting in difficulty with walking, or dependence on walking aids or a wheelchair for mobility. There is instability, lack of motor skills and muscle coordination. Stiff muscles and spasms can lead to painful skeletal deformities and dislocations.

Other symptoms may include total or partial inability to speak, see, hear and/or eat, impaired cognitive ability, and epilepsy.

Around 34,000 Australians have this physical disability.

Down syndrome is a genetic condition that occurs at conception, and is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In Australia about 1 in 700 children are born with down syndrome.

Deafness is defined as partial or complete hearing loss. Deaf and hard of hearing people can experience anything from a very mild to a total loss of hearing.

Elderly adults who frequently experience a loss of hearing, and as a result can potentially experience social isolation, relationship breakdowns and an increase in mental health related issues.

Environmental factors (such as noise, drugs, and toxins) and inherited disorders can lead to deafness.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 1993 there were 93,600 people in WA with some form of hearing loss and 1,200 of those people use Auslan (Australian sign language) as their main mode of communication.

95 per cent of deaf babies are born to non-deaf families.

Projections for 2050 indicate that one in every four Australians will have some form of hearing loss.

Intellectual disabilities or impairments develop before adulthood and can impact a person’s ability to learn, communicate, retain information, or undertake work or leisure activities.

An intellectual disability may be caused by genetic conditions, problems during pregnancy and birth, illness, or environmental factors.

Categories of mild, moderate, severe and profound levels of intellectual impairment are defined on the basis of IQ scores. A person is classified as having an intellectual disability if their IQ falls below 70.

Intellectual disabilities include autism, Fragile X Syndrome, Down Syndrome and Developmental Delay.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition of the central nervous system, interfering with nerve impulses within the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. It is characterised by sclerosis a Greek word meaning scars. These scars occur within the central nervous system and depending on where they develop, manifest into various symptoms.

MS affects over 25,600 in Australia and more than two million diagnosed worldwide. Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 20-40, but it can affect younger and older people too. Roughly three times as many women have MS as men.

There is currently no known cure for MS however there are a number of treatment options available to help manage symptoms and slow progression of the disease.

Source: www.ms.org.au 

A person is considered legally blind if they cannot see at six metres what someone with normal vision can see at 60 metres or if their field of vision is less than 20 degrees in diameter.

Government departments use the term ‘legally blind’ to define a person whose degree of sight loss entitles them to special benefits.

What is low vision?

A person is said to have low vision when they have permanent vision loss that cannot be corrected with glasses and affects their daily functioning.

Low vision can affect people of all ages and can have an impact on many aspects of a person’s life. It may cause problems with recognising faces, reading the newspaper, dialling the telephone or seeing road signs.

Blindness and low vision in Australia

In 2016 Vision Australia estimates there are 384,000 people in Australia who are blind or have low vision. We project this number will grow to 564,000 by 2030. (Refractive error* not included)

In Australia only 3% to 5% of print material is available in an accessible format. (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions website.)

*Refractive error is a condition of the eye that can generally be treated through the use of prescription glasses.

Information source: Visability Australia

Read more about living independently on the Vision Australia website

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